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Posts Tagged ‘Anderson Cooper’

What A Twit!

In media, Uncategorized on October 11, 2012 at 7:37 pm

The political gaffes they wish they hadn’t tweeted…

Story by: Michael Kaedig

Twitter is fast becoming the most dangerous vehicle for political ammunition. Delivering an immediate kidney punch in just 140 characters, it’s hardly surprising that raging passions and immediate access to a smartphone have created a surge in PR disasters from hot-headed politicians who have tweeted then deleted. As David Cameron famously said “Too many tweets makes a twat.” Isn’t that the truth?

Valerie Trierweiler: Catfight 

François Hollande

François Hollande (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Most recently in the news for having affairs with  Socialist president (and then husband of Segolene Royal), Francois  Hollande, as well as the married Conservative politician Patrick Devedjian at the same time, Miss Trierweiler created a stir back in June after sending a Twitter message encouraging voters to support  Segolene Royal’s rival in the parliamentary elections. Miaow!

Jack Welch: Cooking Lessons

Former G.E. boss tweeted “Unbelievable jobs numbers … these Chicago guys will do anything … can’t debate so change numbers,” in response to Preisdent Obama’s announcement during the debate that the September jobs rate stood at 7.8%.  His incredulity was in part because the new numbers brought the unemployment down to below 8% for the first time in the past four years. When grilled by Anderson Cooper, Welch remained unapologetic for his remarks despite admitting that he had no real evidence for his accusations.  Welch now says he should have added a question mark to the tweet, to show he was questioning rather than accusing the Obama administration of outright fraud.

Dorries vs Mensch

Twitter 6x6

After Ms Dorries accused Mrs Mensch of unprofessionalism during the Murdoch trial, in which she left early to pick up her child from school, of  “putting her own ambitions first” and of being “devoid of principle”, fellow Conservative MP Mensch responded with the following tweet:

 “Waking up to find self on the Nadine Dorries naughty step, which is a pity as I spend my entire life worrying about what she thinks (ahem).”

A Weiner For All Seasons

The career of Democratic US Congressman Anthony Weiner was effectively over after he tweeted a sexual photo of himself  to a young supporter. Weinergate proved that if you’ve got skin in the game, you should be mindful how you play it. Embarrassing stuff.

Newsmax.com: Jack Welch: Obama Cooking the Books on Jobs

 Other related articles

Anderson Cooper’s Coming Out Matters

In media, Uncategorized on July 6, 2012 at 3:43 pm

CNN’s silver haired, blue eyed adonis, the network’s most eligible bachelor, Anderson Cooper, is now officially off the market for us ladies.

A few days ago Anderson publicly came out  in an email to The Daily Beast’s Andrew Sullivan:

Andrew, as you know, the issue you raise is one that I’ve thought about for years. Even though my job puts me in the public eye, I have tried to maintain some level of privacy in my life. Part of that has been for purely personal reasons. I think most people want some privacy for themselves and the people they are close to. But I’ve also wanted to retain some privacy for professional reasons. Since I started as a reporter in war zones 20 years ago, I’ve often found myself in some very dangerous places. For my safety and the safety of those I work with, I try to blend in as much as possible, and prefer to stick to my job of telling other people’s stories, and not my own. I have found that sometimes the less an interview subject knows about me, the better I can safely and effectively do my job as a journalist. I’ve always believed that who a reporter votes for, what religion they are, who they love, should not be something they have to discuss publicly. As long as a journalist shows fairness and honesty in his or her work, their private life shouldn’t matter. I’ve stuck to those principles for my entire professional career, even when I’ve been directly  12039_084asked “the gay question,” which happens occasionally. I did not address my sexual orientation in the memoir I wrote several years ago because it was a book focused on war, disasters, loss and survival. I didn’t set out to write about other aspects of my life. Recently, however, I’ve begun to consider whether the unintended outcomes of maintaining my privacy outweigh personal and professional principle. It’s become clear to me that by remaining silent on certain aspects of my personal life for so long, I have given some the mistaken impression that I am trying to hide something – something that makes me uncomfortable, ashamed or even afraid. This is distressing because it is simply not true. I’ve also been reminded recently that while as a society we are moving toward greater inclusion and equality for all people, the tide of history only advances when people make themselves fully visible. There continue to be far too many incidences of bullying of young people, as well as discrimination and violence against people of all ages, based on their sexual orientation, and I believe there is value in making clear where I stand. The fact is, I’m gay, always have been, always will be, and I couldn’t be any more happy, comfortable with myself, and proud. I have always been very open and honest about this part of my life with my friends, my family, and my colleagues. In a perfect world, I don’t think it’s anyone else’s business, but I do think there is value in standing up and being counted. I’m not an activist, but I am a human being and I don’t give that up by being a journalist. Since my early days as a reporter, I have worked hard to accurately and fairly portray 19447_001_1563_CCgay and lesbian people in the media – and to fairly and accurately portray those who for whatever reason disapprove of them. It is not part of my job to push an agenda, but rather to be relentlessly honest in everything I see, say and do. I’ve never wanted to be any kind of reporter other than a good one, and I do not desire to promote any cause other than the truth. Being a journalist, traveling to remote places, trying to understand people from all walks of life, telling their stories, has been the greatest joy of my professional career, and I hope to continue doing it for a long time to come. But while I feel very blessed to have had so many opportunities as a journalist, I am also blessed far beyond having a great career. I love, and I am loved. In my opinion, the ability to love another person is one of God’s greatest gifts, and I thank God every day for enabling me to give and share love with the people in my life. I appreciate your asking me to weigh in on this, and I would be happy for you to share my thoughts with your readers. I still consider myself a reserved person and I hope this doesn’t mean an end to a small amount of personal space. But I do think visibility is important, more important than preserving my reporter’s shield of privacy.

Anderson Cooper is an incredibly talented reporter, and his decision to come out is a very brave choice to make. Homophobia and anti-gay sentiment appears much more prevalent in the US than in the UK, where an electoral candidate’s views on gay marriage could  never be used as a platform for an election campaign or as a way to gain favour with potential voters. In addition to facing domestic opposition in the US from the religious right, Cooper of course regularly interviews foreign leaders whose political ideologies directly oppose his own. Certainly, I think Anderson Cooper’s coming out will have repercussions on the way people react to and interact with him in the future. Although I believe that reporters should be allowed the same rights of privacy as anyone else, his sexuality does matter. As a media celebrity, he has the power to raise awareness about gay rights issues, and hopefully to get some people to question their own prejudice.